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Elegant Cakes – Paleo “Oatmeal” Cookies (vegan option)
Life Should Be Cake

Paleo “Oatmeal” Cookies (vegan option)

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These paleo “oatmeal” cookies (also known as n’oatmeal cookies) are crisp with a chewy center and taste JU classic oatmeal raisin cookies! Recipe has a vegan option. Thanks to Nordic Ware for making today’s post possible.

Due to the lack of oats, these paleo “oatmeal” cookies don’t really look like regular oatmeal raisin cookies, but to me, they taste exactly like the real deal.

And not just any old oatmeal cookie but really amazing soft and chewy ones! To make up for the missing oats, I added shredded coconut and ground flax seed. It sounds weird, but it works!

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Make sure to use shredded coconut, like the left two in this picture, and not flaked coconut, which you see on the right.

I used refined coconut oil in these cookies and they came out with absolutely no coconut taste. If you use unrefined coconut oil, they’ll likely have a bit of coconut taste to them, thought it shouldn’t be at all overwhelming!

You can’t taste the flax, either. It somehow just makes the cookies more oatmeal-like! If you have whole flax seeds, an electric coffee grinder is a great tool to grind them.

This recipe is based on my perfect paleo chocolate chip cookies. Unlike that version, I haven’t made these with butter or brown sugar. I’m guessing that they’d work but since I haven’t tried it, I can’t say for sure.

I also don’t recommend playing around with the recipe (unless you’re okay with them not coming out as intended). This is one of those recipes I had to make over 30 times to get right, which is madness considering it’s based off of another recipe!

If you omit the coconut or flax, the cookies won’t have the right texture as I had to make a lot of changes to the recipe to accommodate those two ingredients. I’d just make the original recipe and add raisins instead of chocolate chips if you don’t want to add flax or coconut.

And if you’re thinking you’d like to add a little more coconut or flax seed or another add-in like that, then be prepared for some super dense and chewy cookies. The first dozen batches or so were work to eat.

Eating cookies should never require too much effort. ;) These paleo n’oatmeal cookies are chewier than the chocolate chip version, but I figured that was fitting for oatmeal cookies!

Even something as simple as adding more cinnamon had a weird effect on these cookies! I’ve made them with 1, 1 1/2 and 2 teaspoons of cinnamon. 1 teaspoon was just perfect and any more than that made the cookies bitter.

I’ve gotten so many of the same questions on the original recipe that I’ve answered any questions I think you may have in the footnotes of the recipe. Be sure to read those for general tips and notes on subs!

Naturals Bakeware Collection from Nordic Ware

I’ve posted a few recipes using Nordic Ware Bundt pans, like this coconut rum cake and this bourbon pumpkin cake but did you know that they make so much more than awesome Bundt pans?

As I was browsing their site thinking about what products my readers may especially be interested in, the Naturals Bakeware line jumped out at me.

I’m guessing I’m not the only one here who avoids pans with non-stick coatings. Some people say they’re safe but I’d rather not risk it. The Naturals Line contains all your baking basics like cake pans, muffin pans, jelly roll pans, loaf pans, pie pans and more — and none of them have non-stick coatings!

Something else that I thought is neat is that this line is perfect for gluten-free baking. Wheat alternatives, like the almond flour and coconut flour used in this recipe, need a natural surface to grab on to as they rise during baking — and an uncoated baking pan is ideal in such situations.

I didn’t know about this until after I had made my video, hence the silicone baking mat. I later baked a few cookies directly on the sheet, without parchment paper or a mat, and they didn’t stick at all nor did they flatten more than they were supposed to!

Insulated Baking Sheet

I’m not sure why, but most of the baking sheets in Germany are black or very dark gray. The first few months after moving here, I burned the bottom of all my cookies, not realizing the cookie sheets were to blame. Since then, I know how important a good baking sheet is!

So I wanted to give Nordic Ware’s Insulated Baking Sheet a try. I’d never had an insulated pan before and so naturally was intrigued.

What makes this baking sheet different? It has a cushion of air between two layers of aluminum, which helps prevent over-browned cookie bottoms and overdone pizza crusts, especially in ovens with hot spots. That’s a problem in my oven and I usually have to rotate the cookie sheet halfway through. I didn’t need to do that when I used this pan and they came out perfectly!

And just like all the other products in the Naturals Bakeware line, the baking sheet is made of natural pure aluminum that won’t rust and produces evenly browned baked goods every time – and it’s sustainably manufactured in the USA.

Thanks again to Nordic Ware for sponsoring today’s post! By the way, they have a bunch of amazing new items, which you can find here. I can’t wait to get my hands on that Lotus Bundt Pan! Isn’t it pretty?!

Paleo “Oatmeal” Cookies (vegan option, grain-free, gluten-free, dairy-free)

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